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July 25, 2017

High willingness in healthcare industry to adopt new technology

76 percent of all US healthcare providers are eager to adopt new technology such as connected medical devices. The lack of support from the IT industry is a big problem in getting from willingness to actual implementation, an ABI research survey finds. The healthcare industry also sees government incentives for modernization of services more often as a barrier then as support for technology adoption.

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The importance of healthcare services combined with the sharply rising cost of its delivery helped to make healthcare an industry under intense political scrutiny, ABI Research states. But just as U.S. national and state governments aim to incentivize modernization and cut costs with a raft of political action, the industry itself places the blame elsewhere.

Government incentives often barrier

In its recent B2B technology survey of 50 U.S.-based healthcare companies, ABI finds that government incentives are the lowest primary driver, worse even, a barrier for technology adoption. There is far more concern about healthcare providers’ ability to win support internally for smart health initiatives.

 “Our survey revealed that U.S. healthcare is clearly interested and investigating a range of emerging technologies, but significant concern regarding implementation stems not from regulatory demands but from complexity and institutional inertia,” says Jonathan Collins, Research Director at ABI Research. “Healthcare organizations face a raft of issues in adopting new technologies that stem from a lack of support and understanding both from within their organizations but also from technology suppliers.”

Key willingness to embrace technologies

The survey found a key willingness to embrace developing technologies, with 76 percent of healthcare respondents rating their organizations’ willingness to embrace technologies as a 7 or higher out of 10. This is notably higher than the 66 percent of respondents from nine verticals, reported in the same survey.

Technologies under consideration range from connected medical devices to renewable energy management, and a focus on improving patient services and operating efficiency drives this adoption. However, that potential for improvement through smart health adoption will remain unfulfilled if healthcare providers do not get the support they need from the IT industry.

“Our survey highlights a substantial market being held back because CTOs and their staff cannot win the kind of backing to support for their efforts,” concludes Collins. “While these organizations favor developing projects internally, they need telecom providers and systems integrators to provide the expertise and experience to not only deploy new technology but provide the use case and ROI details to win internal support for technology projects that will improve the cost and the quality of healthcare.”

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